Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Connections

While reading the news online this evening I saw an article about the Canadian Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, in Holten, the Netherlands, paying tribute to the Canadians who paid with their lives to liberate that country 70 years ago. That reminded me of an event far back in my own history, when I was too young to realize its significance. That was the celebration of the 10th anniversary of the liberation of the Netherlands.

I received the commemorative cup illustrated below as an innocent youngster in kindergarten. My recollection of that event is that the cup was filled with candy. Little did I know then that within 2 years I would emigrate to the country that was primarily responsible for the liberation of the Netherlands.

My mother safeguarded this cup for many years until it could be entrusted to me. Since then it has stood tucked inside a cabinet from where I would occasionally take it and ponder it in silence. It reminds me of the connection I have with these two countries - one of my birth and the second which adopted me.

Amazing the significance something of such little monetary value can hold.





17 comments:

Cloudia said...

Oh Rick! Thanks for sharing this important post and object




ALOHA from Honolulu,
ComfortSpiral
=^..^=

Jerry E Beuterbaugh said...

I don't know if my dad made it to Holland. I know he came close. For he was seriously wounded at the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium. Oh, and he was always quite emphatic about Beuterbaugh being Dutch--NOT GERMAN! Although, I have found out differently since.

biebkriebels said...

Oh Rick this is so cute you still have it! I remember the 10th year celebration too, I was was 8 years old and we didn't get a cup at school but a grey carton folder filled with sheets about World War II. I still must have it somewhere in my house but have to look for it.
Groeten, Marianne

Pamela Gordon said...

What a nice remembrance of a special time in history for you and your family, and a very special keepsake. Blessings!

Buttons Thoughts said...

I knew there was something we had in common. I love your Mom and this is a very time day for both countries. Hug B

Marleen said...

How wonderful to see that you still have this from so many years ago. Best wishes from the Netherlands!

ju-north said...

Something really previous and unique to you!

Ruth Hiebert said...

That is a very special cup and your memories that go with are even better.

Stephanie said...


Thanks for sharing a special momento that is dear to you. A very attractive cup.

Joke (Joke's Camera) said...

Zo leuk, ik herken deze bekers, Rick. Ook hier in de familie hadden we ze. Na vele verhuizingen, het overlijden van mijn ouders en het uitruimen van diverse huizen zijn ze verdwenen. Misschien dat ze nog ergens in een doos op zolder zitten. Mooie herinnering, waar 2 landen samen komen. Groetjes, Joke

Scott said...

Cool story and your mother was obviously very smart to tuck this away for awhile.

Kate said...

A highly significant memento definitely worth safeguarding all these years. A childhood memory and a grateful adult!

Helma said...

Hoi Rick,
wat leuk om dit te lezen :-))))) De beker die je kreeg om de Bevrijdingsdag te vieren is nog hele mooi. Echt hele leuk dat je deze nog bewaard hebt en nu hier in je post laat zien. Ik wist dat je uit Nederland kwam en als ik dit dan lees dan geeft me dat een goed gevoel :-)

Groetjes, Helma

magda said...

Είναι μία σπουδαία ανάμνηση και μια εξαιρετική ανάρτηση!
Είναι πολύ νοσταλγικές οι φωτογραφίες σου!
Πολλούς χαιρετισμούς σε όλους!

darlin said...

Rick this is so interesting, I've learned something new this fine Sunday morning. I think that's so cool you still have the cup and there's some things which money just can't buy.

Have yourself a wonderful day, finally NO SNOW! Wooohooo lol

Teca M. Jorge said...

This is a lovely moment indeed... I appreciated your post, honey!
I hope you have fun in spring.

Many beijos, hugs, flowers and love.

Reader Wil said...

Thank you for this post, Rick. Yes Canada is an important country for the Dutch.
When the Canadians liberated The Netherlands, my mother, my two younger sisters and I were still in a Japanese concentrationcamp on the Indonesian Isle of Java, ignorant of what was going on in Europe.
We were free to leave the camp after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs were dropped. This didn't mean that we were liberated, because the Indonesian people wanted us to leave the country. We were the colonists.
So we did, and went to Singapore and from there to the country where I was born: The Netherlands, where we arrived on the 2nd January 1946. I was twelve in December 1945.I never left this country, which has been good to me. Here I married and got three children.One of them lives in Australia now. I have 5 grandchildren.
Wil Francois